36 Awesome Places to visit in Belgium.

places to visit in Belgium

If you are here, means you are looking for the awesome places to visit in Belgium. For those who love Renaissance architecture and medieval towns, Belgium is the perfect place to visit. It is also the home to NATO and the European Union.

The country is divided into distinct regions, Flanders and Wallonia, which speak different languages. To the east is the German-speaking community. Brussels is the country’s bilingual capital, with its elegant art-nouveau buildings and ornate guildhalls. Whether you’re traveling with a partner or planning a trip to Belgium on your own, there’s plenty to do here.

When traveling by train, be prepared to spend eleven hours, or four days to see all the places you want to see. A plane to Belgium can save you about $50, and a train to Antwerp takes three hours. A car rental in Belgium gives you more freedom and flexibility when planning your itinerary. You’ll also be able to explore towns and cities at your own pace. Getting to Belgium by plane is easy and cheap.

When it comes to cultural attractions, there are numerous places to visit in Belgium. Though there are approximately 581 communes in Belgium but the major tourist attracting cities are Brussels, Bruges, Ghent, Antwerp, Tournai, Bouillon, Ardennes and Liège. Hence I will be presenting the tourist attractions of the these places mainly. I do aggrege there will be many more beautiful sites I will be missing here but covering those in a single guide will be gigantic in size. Here I present

36 Awesome Places to Visit in Belgium.

  1. Grand Place
  2. Saint-Michel Cathedral
  3. Atomium
  4. Place Royale – Koningsplein
  5. Belgium Royal Museum of Fine Arts
  6. Mini Europe
  7. Gravensteen
  8. Museum Voor Schone Kunsten
  9. St Bavo’s Cathedral
  10. Belfry of Ghent
  11. Grote Market Square
  12. Historic Centre of Brugge
  13. Belfry Tower
  14. Gruuthuse Mansion
  15. Minnewater Lake
  16. Museum aan de Stroom MAS
  17. Cathedral of Our Lady
  18. Plantin-Moretus Museum
  19. St. Paul’s Church
  20. Havenroute
  21. Notre Dame Cathedral
  22. The Belfry of Tourna
  23. Museum of Fine Arts
  24. Jungle City – Amusement park
  25. Le Grand Curtius Museum
  26. Coteaux de la Citadelle
  27. Montagne de Bueren
  28. St. Paul’s Cathedral in Liege
  29. Liège-Guillemins railway station
  30. Castle of Bouillon
  31. Dinant Citadel
  32. Bastogne War Museum
  33. Château Féodal de La Roche-en-Ardenne
  34. Citadel of Namur
  35. Pont de Fragnée
  36. The Battlefields of Flanders

1. Grand Place

Grand Place

The Grand Place (Grote Markt) is a large central square in Brussels, Belgium. Surrounding this open-air space are the opulent Baroque guildhalls of the former Guilds of Brussels, the Flamboyant Town Hall and the neo-Gothic King’s House, which contains the Brussels City Museum. A visit to this square will surely reward you with the opportunity to see many things, from medieval art to contemporary sculpture.

The Grand Place is a major tourist attraction and is a must-see attraction. Tourists are constantly snapping pictures of it. The floodlights give it a surreal atmosphere. The historical buildings in Grand Place depict the progress and achievements of a mercantile city in northern Europe. The city has a rich history and is well worth a visit. You can explore this historical site and learn about the city’s rich history by exploring this UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The sandbanks that once covered this place were reclaimed in the 12th century. The sand bank’s foundation was a market. The hotel was built as a guild house, and was destroyed by the French cannonade. You can admire the Gothic architecture of the building and the octagonal belfry spire which towers 376 feet above Brussels. It is worth noting that the statues of the devil and the prophets are located near the main entrance to the market. The city hall is also within walking distance.

2. Saint-Michel Cathedral

Saint-Michel Cathedral
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The Saint-Michel Cathedral is a medieval Roman Catholic cathedral in the center of Brussels, Belgium. The cathedral is dedicated to the patron saints of Brussels. It is considered the finest example of Brabantine Gothic architecture in the world. This magnificent structure has been a place of worship since the 12th century. Located at the center of the city, the Saint-Michel is an impressive sight to behold. In addition to its religious significance, the cathedral’s beautiful and unusual design is a must-see.

The cathedral is also a beautiful place of worship. Its baroque pulpit dates back to 1699, and its original oak confessionals are 17th century. Other features of the Saint-Michel Cathedral include its stained-glass windows. The “treasure” of the Cathedral is found in the Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament of the Miracle. The doors are eighteenth century iron forged and contain numerous religious artwork, including relics, tunics, altarpieces, and paintings.

The Saint-Michel Cathedral is one of the most important monuments in Brussels. It is dedicated to the saints of Brussels, Michel de Montfort and Anne of Austria. Built in the early thirteenth century, it has twin 69-metre-high towers and a chapel with stained glass windows from 1540. A small park outside the cathedral is a pleasant spot for a walk. There are benches and tables for resting in the sun.

3. Atomium

Atomium

The Atomium is a landmark building in Laeken, Belgium. The original structure was built for the 1958 World’s Fair in Brussels. Today, it houses a museum and is a popular destination for tourists and locals alike. Here, you can learn about the history of science and technology, and see the fascinating artifacts that were created inside. The buildings were once the site of a world’s fair, but are now an important museum that focuses on the area’s past.

When the Atomium was built, it was intended to be a permanent structure to showcase science and technology. It resembles a cluster of silver space orbs. The atomic structure was specifically designed to resemble the shape of an iron crystal, which would be 165 billion times magnified. The building now serves as a science center and features educational exhibits, crazy light displays, and even a gift shop. It has become a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is the largest scientific exhibition centre in Europe.

The building was constructed to be the main pavilion for the 1958 World Fair in Brussels. It became a symbol of optimism and a golden future for humankind. The building was built to last only six months, but it was criticized for being dilapidated in the late 90s. Luckily, the Belgian government decided to change the law and allow people to post their photos online again. The Atomium website still requires permission to reproduce their images, but it acknowledges that the law change made it legal to post their photographs.

4. Place Royale – Koningsplein

Place Royale - Koningsplein

Brussels’ historic neoclassical Place Royale is a stunning sight. Part of the new Brussels Park urban project, this square is flanked by several of the city’s major museums. It is a wonderful place to stroll and people-watch, and the neoclassical architecture is absolutely beautiful. To get the full experience, you must make the time to visit the many museums and attractions here.

The Place Royale is a large historic neoclassical square that is one of the city’s most popular attractions. It is a perfect example of the neoclassical style and is bordered by some of the city’s major museums. The building that is now known as the Belgian Parliament is situated in the center. Located in the heart of the city, it is surrounded by a variety of public buildings, including a museum of art and a modern art gallery.

This historical piazza was constructed in 1787 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Italian sculptor Carlo di Lorena. The square is located in the Mont des arts district and was damaged by fire in its early years. It has undergone a lengthy restoration process to make it one of the most popular and picturesque places in Brussels. If you’re interested in visiting Belgium, the Place Royale is a must-visit location.

5. Belgium Royal Museum of Fine Arts

belgium royal museum of fine arts
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The Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium is a collection of six museums in Brussels, the capital of Belgium. These museums are home to famous works of art from all around the world. A visit to any of these galleries is guaranteed to provide an unforgettable experience. The Oldmasters Museum, Magritte Gallery, Fin-de-Sicle Gallery, Antoine Wiertz Art Museum, and Constantin Meunier Art Exhibition are some of the best examples of the region’s cultural diversity.

The Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium is a must-see in Brussels. This comprehensive collection spans two centuries and contains more than 20,000 works of art. The collection includes Flemish Primitives, and works from the former Southern Netherlands. The galleries contain decorative and furniture pieces from the last few centuries, as well as works from non-European countries. The staff at the museum is dedicated to the constant expansion and innovation of its collections.

The museum is divided into four separate buildings. Two of these reside in the same building. The Museum of Ancient Art and the Museum of Modern Art share a common space. The collection also includes works by the famous Flemish Primitives. The galleries at the Royal Artists’ Palace are connected to the Magritte Museum. In addition to being home to more than two thousand works of art, the Royal Institute of Fine Arts also has a contemporary section, including works by David, Alechinsky, Bacon, Fabre, and Dali.

6. Mini Europe

Mini Europe

Mini-Europe is a miniature park in Bruparck, Belgium, located at the foot of the Atomium in Brussels. The park contains replicas of famous European Union and other European monuments at a scale of 1:25. There are approximately 80 cities and 350 buildings represented at the miniature park. The park is a fun place to visit, and children and adults alike will enjoy seeing the miniature versions of their favorite landmarks. There are several ways to spend a day at the mini-Europe park.

The guidebook for Mini-Europe is a mock EU policy document. It criticizes the low proportion of European GDP spent on research and blames the euro crisis on a lack of Europe. The park’s Atomium futuristic structure is an iconic landmark in the city. There is no half-way membership to Mini-Europe, and the tiny nation-states do not have any room for EU hopefuls. Despite the fact that this miniature world has no political value, Mini-Europe is an excellent place to learn about the world.

Located at the foot of the Atomium, the Mini-Europe park is a unique way to experience the European continent. It features replicas of the most iconic buildings, as well as a simulated version of the Grand Place. It also includes a clock, a model of the Belgian parliament, and current events in Europe. Guests will spend about 2 hours walking through the miniature world, and many are amazed at how much detail has been incorporated.

7. Gravensteen

Gravensteen

The medieval castle of Gravensteen is located in Ghent, East Flanders, Belgium. It dates back to the year 1180, and was the home of the Counts of Flanders until 1353. This is one of the oldest and most beautiful castles in Europe. Throughout its history, Gravensteen served as a prison, cotton factory, mint, and court. Today, you can tour the beautiful medieval castle and learn more about the rich history of the area.

The city of Ghent is a great place to visit for people interested in architecture. Taking the train to the Sint-Pieters station will take you to Gravensteen in just over half an hour. The museum is open daily from 10am to 6pm, and last tickets are sold at 4.40pm. The park is closed on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. You can also visit the city’s historic districts during the day, or visit Gravensteen at night.

If you’re interested in history, you should visit Gravensteen castle in Ghent. This historical building was once the seat of the Counts of Flanders, and was used as a prison and courthouse from the 14th century until the 18th century. Before the 1700s, the castle was used for torture and executions, but now it is a museum and a must-see landmark in Ghent.

8. Museum Voor Schone Kunsten

Museum Voor Schone Kunsten

Museum Voor Schone Kunsten is an excellent choice if you’re looking for a cultural experience in Brussels. It’s a large collection of art that showcases works from various eras and cultures. It features a variety of artwork from different countries. The collections in the art museum include works by famous artists like René Magritte and Claude Monet. The Antoine Wiertz Museum houses pieces by Belgian artists of the last century, including Van Gogh.

This museum is located in Ghent, Belgium, near the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunsten. It features a wide selection of artwork from the 14th to 20th centuries. Most of the collection is French. There are also a large number of sculptures. The Museum recently reopened after a four-year renovation project. Visitors can expect to see a variety of pieces from this renowned institution.

Founded in 1780, the Museum of Fine Arts in Ghent is one of the three major museums in Flanders. Its collection includes works by famous artists like Peter Paul Rubens and Flemish Primitives. It also houses a collection of graphic works from Belgian artists. A visit to the museum is a great way to explore the city’s rich cultural history. You’ll be pleased to learn that Ghent’s art history is rich and diverse.

9. St Bavo’s Cathedral

St Bavos Cathedral

The 89-meter-tall Saint Bavos Cathedral is a Gothic cathedral in Ghent, Belgium. The Gothic cathedral is the seat of the diocese of Ghent and is known for the Ghent Altarpiece. There are many things to see in the St Bavos Cathedral, but here are five of our favorites. Listed below is a brief history of the building. Also included is an interactive map that shows the city’s most famous landmarks.

The highlight of St Bavos Cathedral is the enormous 24-panel altarpiece – “The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb.” This magnificent painting is a masterpiece of renaissance art, and was completed by Jan van Eyck in 1432. The luminous oils and naturalistic depictions of people broke with the rigid styles of the Gothic style, revealing a more modern side to art. The painting was commissioned by a wealthy alderman in 1420, but Jan van Eyck finished it after his brother died in 1426.

The interior is filled with interesting details. The high choir is the most important part of the cathedral. It houses the stables of members of the Chapter of Saint-Bavon. The right side of the choir also holds the episcopal throne and arms. The Baroque-style high altar and tomb monuments of the late-Venetian bishops, Antonius Triest, and Jan Steenwerck, are among the highlights of the interior decoration of the choir.

10. Belfry of Ghent

Belfry of Ghent

The Belfry of Ghent is a 91-metre-high medieval tower. It is one of three medieval towers in the city. The other two are Saint Bavo Cathedral and Saint Nicholas’ Church. The Belfry of Ghent is the tallest belfry in Belgium, which is why it is the most popular tourist attraction in the city. It was built between 1340 and 1420.

The construction of the Belfry is thought to have begun in 1314, as the first plans for the tower have been found in the Bijloke Museum. The Belfry had six stories, with a wooden spire added between 1377 and 1380. It was crowned with the legendary “Dragon of Ghent” in 1380. Despite the many changes over the centuries, the spire of the Belfry remains an iconic symbol of Ghent.

The Belfry of Ghent has a stunning 360-degree view of the city. If you visit during the day, you’ll be able to see the entire city. If you’re visiting in the spring or summer, you’ll want to visit at sunset. If you’re visiting during the tourist season, you’ll want to avoid the busy staircases. Otherwise, the views are spectacular.

The Belfry of Ghent is one of the city’s famous medieval towers. The tower is 91 meters high and is situated between Saint Bavo Cathedral and Saint Nicholas’ Church. The construction started in 1314. In the past, the Belfry was a prison for the city. The inner area was used as a guard room. The mammelokker statue depicts an old Roman legend.

11. Grote Market Square

Grote Market Square

Antwerp’s Grote Market Square is a stunning town square in the old city quarter, a beautiful setting for any holiday. This area is filled with 16th century guildhalls and a lavish city hall. During the winter, you can enjoy a holiday market, which also includes an ice rink. The historical buildings surrounding the square are a wonderful way to spend a few hours. During your stay in Antwerp, you should visit the town’s Christmas Market and try out the ice rink.

If you plan to visit Antwerp, it’s best to explore the city on foot. You can visit the Old Town’s Brabo Fountain and explore the Guild Houses, which are a glimpse of medieval times. If you’re visiting for the first time, be sure to stop at the city’s tourist office, which is located on the Grote Markt. A tour of the historic quarter can be enjoyed on foot or by bike.

The Grote Market is an important part of Ypres’ life and bustles with activity throughout the year. There are numerous special events held on the square throughout the year, which attract additional tourists from all over the world. In September, you can enjoy the Ypres Memorial Tattoo, while on 11 November, you can attend an Armistice Day parade, which cordons off the market square to traffic and broadcasts a live video link from the Menin Gate Memorial.

12. Historic Centre of Brugge

Historic Centre of Brugge
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The Historic Centre of Brugge has retained the original pattern of streets, canals, and open spaces. Most buildings were built in the 18th and 19th centuries. In addition, new quarters were created. The town’s first railway station and theatre were built in 1867. The Gothic cathedral dominates the skyline. There are many examples of post-medieval interventions in the historic center. Throughout the town, architecture and urban structures reflect each period of the city’s history.

The medieval character and look of Brugge have been preserved, despite the city’s decline in the 16th century. There are several museums, activities, and historic sites located in the historic centre. A visit to the city will give you a glimpse of the city’s identity and history. The Gothic and Renaissance styles are predominant throughout the Historic Centre of Bruges, and the Flemish Primitives school was established here.

The Renaissance-style palace and the town’s Gothic-style buildings are the most notable sights. In the 15th century, Brugge was a major trading centre for the Hansean empire. The town’s role as a Hansean wharehouse brought wealth to the city. The Flemish Primitives painting school flourished in Brugge. Artists such as Jan van Eyck and Hans Memling were born there. As the 16th century wore on, the wealth began to wane. The Renaissance-styled buildings still retain the city’s medieval character and evoke a sense of its medieval past.

13. Belfry Tower

The Belfry Tower is the tallest tower in Wales

The Belfry Tower is the tallest tower in Wales and can be seen from a distance of over four miles. The original tower was destroyed in 1280, but it was rebuilt during the Middle Ages. In the early 15th century, the Belfry Tower had a wooden spire, but this was destroyed twice by fire. After the last fire, the spire was never rebuilt. The belfry has 47 bells which play music. It has 366 steps that take you to the top.

The belfry tower is the highest point in the city. There are narrow passages that can accommodate only a few people at a time. Once you reach the top, you can enjoy the panoramic view of Bruges. The belfry has benches and rest areas. You can even sit in the benches to admire the views. The belfry tower is a popular attraction in Bruges, so be sure to visit it when you’re in town.

The Belfry Tower is located on the top of the Cloth Hall and is free to enter for children. The tower is steep and can be difficult to climb for kids, but it is worth the effort. A three-year-old may not be able to climb the 366 stairs alone. The tower’s steep staircase makes it difficult for carrying a toddler. In addition, the spire was damaged during the fire of 1280, but it was rebuilt again. The 14th and 15th centuries saw the addition of new elements to the tower. The ornate wooden spire and statues on top of the spire were among the elements added to the structure.

14. Gruuthuse Mansion

Gruuthuse Mansion

One of the most impressive mansions in Belgium is the Gruuthuse Mansion. It is a neoclassical masterpiece, made of brick and stone, which was built in the 15th century. The house is a beautiful sight, and is a must-see when in the area. Today, the mansion is a museum, but visitors can still experience the grandeur of the past.

The original 15th century palace was home to fugitive English king Edward IV. It was a great source of income, and the Lords of the town had exclusive rights to tax dried herbs. This palace is now a museum devoted to the lords of the town. The museum has excellent collection of antiques. The old Flemish kitchen is a highlight, as is the dispensary.

The interior of the building is decorated with medieval-style details, but there are no remnants of the building’s medieval era. It contains an oak-panelled oratory with an oriel window facing the Church of Our Lady. The oratory was built so that the Lords could attend mass from their private residence, and is topped with a vaulted wood half-dome. The remaining decoration is suggestive of a damask pattern.

The museum’s collection of applied arts is one of the highlights of a visit to the city. It is housed in the medieval town of Gruuthuse, where Louis de Grouthuse lived in the 15th and 16th centuries. Its collections are extensive, ranging from the fifteenth century to the 19th century. The museum is currently closed while it undergoes major restorations. The reopening of the museum is expected to occur in early 2019.

15. Minnewater Lake

Minnewater Lake

Minnewater Lake is a scenic lake in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The town was named for the beautiful Minnewater, the Germanic word for elf or sprite. Apparently, the elves created this lake in order to supply water to the canals of Bruges. This is an intriguing tale, but it’s a little bit of a mystery as to why the lake has such a strange name.

Minnewater Lake is free to visit, and the best time to do so is in the early morning when the lake is most peaceful. You’ll probably enjoy the light mist hanging over the lake as the sun rises. Camping is also permitted in designated areas of the park. Regardless of your preference for accommodations, Minnewater is a popular destination for nature lovers. Make sure to bring your sleeping bag if you’re planning to camp here!

Another beautiful spot in Minnewater Park is the Minnewater Lake, which is surrounded by trees. It’s also known as the Lake of Love, because of its romantic story surrounding the tragic romance of Minna and her warrior lover Stromberg. The story is still popular today, and if you’re a couple, you can walk over the bridge to experience eternal love! Just make sure to plan a visit during a cloudy day!

16. Museum aan de Stroom MAS

Museum aan de Stroom MAS

Located on the river Scheldt in the Eilandje district of Antwerp, Museum aan de Stroom (MAS) opened in May 2011. It is the largest museum in Antwerp and has a collection of over 30,000 works by local and international artists. In addition, the Museum houses a collection of local and international contemporary art. It’s a great place to see the city’s diverse cultural heritage.

The MAS Museum aan de Stroom is situated in the center of Eilandje, which is currently the most ambitious city redevelopment project in the city. With an escalator that circles the entire perimeter of the museum, visitors can experience the city from every angle. This is an excellent place to watch the sun set, and to enjoy the sunset. The MAS has an impressive collection of contemporary art, and is a must-visit for all art lovers.

Inside the MAS, the interior is filled with beautiful works of art. The ‘Freight’ exhibition is on the sixth floor and tells the story of Antwerp’s relationship to world trade. You can also visit the STUDY360 at the top floor and ‘De Marina’, a pop-up exhibition. The MAS also offers practical information for those who want to explore the city’s past.

17. Cathedral of Our Lady

Cathedral of Our Lady

Located in Brooklyn Heights, the oldest and northwest section of the borough, the Maronite Catholic Cathedral of Our Lady of Lebanon is a wonderful place to worship. Across the East River from Manhattan, this historic church is located in the borough’s northernmost section. It is also a popular tourist destination. If you’re looking for a New York City attraction, consider visiting the Cathedral of Our Lady of Lebanon.

The construction of the Cathedral of Our Lady began in 1352 and finished a century later in 1521. The Appelmans brothers, who were also the architects, completed the first stage of construction. The Cathedral is a unique building that contains significant works by Peter Paul Rubens, Otto van Veen, Jacob de Backer, and Marten de Vos. The Gothic interior has more than 2,500 square feet of space and a unique crucifix.

The Cathedral of Our Lady contains important works of art. Several of the paintings are by famous painters such as Jacob de Backer and Marten de Vos. Its belfry is also included in the World Heritage List. The interior of the cathedral is also home to many notable statues. The interior of the Cathedral of Our Lady is a beautiful space. A visit to this place will leave you speechless. There are plenty of restaurants and shops in the area.

18. Plantin-Moretus Museum

Plantin-Moretus Museum

Located in Antwerp, Belgium, the Plantin-Moretus Museum features the work of 16th-century printers Christophe and Jan Moretus. The collection features rare, original prints, manuscripts, and other artifacts, all created by these master printers. The museum is free to visit, and admission is free for students of history. It has been a popular spot for students of art and history to learn about the history of printing.

The Plantin-Moretus Museum includes the living quarters of the Plantin family, as well as paintings by his almost-contemporary and fellow Antwerp citizen Peter Paul Rubens. The museum also has a handsome private library and several rooms hung with expensive Spanish gilt leather. The collection allows visitors to imagine the private life of Plantin, a keen businessman and art patron.

The Plantin-Moretus Museum is located in the heart of Antwerp, where you can listen to the audioguide to learn more about the history of the museum’s artifacts and objects. The audioguide is well-written and informative, with clips of the actual exhibits and a demonstration by a member of the museum’s staff for a school group. You’ll be able to explore the collection yourself, or rely on a guide to take you through.

The Plantin-Moretus Museum is the only ante-Nineteenth-century home of a prominent Antwerp publishing family. It has some of the oldest printing presses in the world and even contains the original Garamond letter. Moreover, the museum’s interior is richly decorated, so you can enjoy a peaceful afternoon. For history buffs, the Plantin-Moretus Museum will offer you an opportunity to get a feel for the family’s history.

19. St. Paul’s Church

St Pauls Church

The spire of St. Pauls is a distinctive architectural feature of the building, but it is not the only landmark in the neighborhood. A 1790 oak statue of Saint. Paul, by an unknown sculptor, graces the front porch of the building. The chapel was used as a refuge for homeless people and rescue workers. In the 1840s, it was designated a National Historic Landmark and received a Lucy G. Moses Preservation Award.

When the construction of the cathedral was complete, sculptural details were added to adorn the structure. Among the prominent sculptors were Grinling Gibbons and Thomas Thornhill. The dome was painted by Robert Adam. Jean Tijou created elaborate metalwork and mosaics. Dykes Bower and Godfrey Allen designed fittings for the interior of the church. William Holman Hunt, the architect of the iconic painting, completed the St. Paul’s version of the work.

The dome of St. Pauls Church is the largest and most impressive collection of baroque confessionals in Belgium. Pieter Verbrugghen I and his workshop completed ten of these chapels in 1659. The cathedral is 356 feet tall with the cross at its top. The dome is supported by a brick cone and lantern section. The inner dome is 28 meters high and is decorated with rich Baroque detail.

20. Havenroute

Havenroute

The Havenroute is one of the most popular bicycle routes in the Netherlands, with more than 100 kilometers of bike paths. Its flat terrain makes it easy for drivers to navigate. The route is clearly marked and is an easy drive for any level of cyclist. In addition, the waterloopbos offers boat cruises and the best view of the city. The tourist office can help you find a bicycle path that suits your needs and preferences.

The Havenroute is a 60-kilometer cycle path from Antwerpen to Brussels. It takes you through a variety of schepen, or havens. On a nice day, you can spot numerous different types of wildlife. Although the cycle path is well-maintained and easy to follow, it is not recommended for beginners because it is a challenging road. This route is best suited for intermediate bikers and novices.

The first part of the ride follows a river and begins in the town of St. Vith. From there, the motorway goes through the countryside and passes through several bocken. You’ll also see a few familiar towns along the way, such as Tongeren and Leuven. However, this trip isn’t as flat as it looks. The first part of the journey starts in Belgium and ends in Luxembourg, while the second part takes you through The Netherlands and Belgium.

21. Notre Dame Cathedral

Notre Dame Cathedral

In Paris, you can’t miss the stunning medieval Catholic cathedral, Notre Dame de Paris. This church is dedicated to the Virgin Mary and is considered the finest example of French Gothic architecture. Whether you’re visiting France for the first time or the thousandth time, you can’t miss this incredible landmark. There are many ways to experience this remarkable building. Read on to learn more about the history and culture of Notre Dame Cathedral.

The cathedral’s stern facade is covered with stone sculpture. Two statues depict The Last Judgment flank the central portal. The exterior design of the Notre Dame Cathedral is balanced between the verticality of the twin towers and the horizontal banding of decorated galleries. The western elevation dominates the square in front of the building. The interior is richly decorated with architectural relief sculpture and the spire. Located in the center of the cathedral, the ambulatory and sacristy are located on either side of the main entrance.

A large part of the cathedral was damaged in the fire, so the restoration process is underway. The restoration process began in June, when the first phase of work was completed. The initial work on securing the cathedral involved removing about 40,000 pieces of scaffolding, which were in place when the fire broke out. After the fire, the interior walls and floors of the cathedral were thoroughly cleaned. The state will outsource the construction, and work will continue until it is finished in late September.

22. The Belfry of Tourna

The Belfry of Tourna

The Belfry of Tournai is a 72-metre-high freestanding bell tower. It contains a 256-step stairway. A trip up the spire is a breathtaking experience. During the climb, you’ll get to see beautiful views of the town. There are also views of the nearby valley. The belfry is open to the public for tours. There’s no admission fee, but you’ll need to be a member of the local church.

The Tournai belfry was built in 1192. Its bell was a symbol of communal freedoms and served as a warning for fires, trials, and executions. It was also used as a prison and watchtower. The bell tower was later converted into a chapel and is now part of the cathedral. This is one of the oldest structures in France, dating from the 13th century.

The Belfry of Tourna is the oldest in Belgium and Northern Europe. It was built in the early thirteenth century by the French King Philippe Auguste. In the year 1294, the Belfry underwent a major restoration, including the addition of side towers and a spire with gilded dragons. The UNESCO-listed belfry is now 72 meters high, but you’ll need to climb two57 steps to reach the top.

The Tournai belfry has been a watchtower since the 12th century. It has many roles in the town. The ringing of the bell was a warning for fires, invasions, and trials. There is no other belfry in Belgium and France as old as the one in Tournai. The construction of the belfry began around 1188.

23. Museum of Fine Arts

Museum of Fine Arts

The Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Belgium are a group of art museums in Brussels, Belgium. These six museums include the Oldmasters Museum, the Magritte Gallery, the Fin-de-Sicle Collection, the Antoine Wiertz Art Gallery, and the Constantin Meunier Art Gallery. These museums showcase a wide variety of art forms. They also exhibit a variety of contemporary and historical works, as well as historic paintings and sculptures.

There are many reasons to visit the Museum of Fine Arts, including its diverse collections. The Museum of Fine Arts’ extensive collection represents the history of Western art. It is home to some of the most important collections in the world, including the largest collection outside of France of Claude Monet paintings, one of the largest public collections of 19th-century American art, and the world’s largest collection of Egyptian Old Kingdom art. The Museum of Natural History is also worth a visit, as it features several exhibits on local and regional history.

The Meunier Museum opened in 1939 and was named a platinum level member of the guild in 1953. The Meunier’s collection became the Museum of Ancient Art in the 1960s. The Old Court was renovated in the 1950s, and modern art collections were moved to the Museum’s “Pocket Museum” on Place Royale/Koningsplein. The institution’s scientific staff was established in 1965. The Museums’ drawing cabinet was the largest collection of works of art in Belgium.

24. Jungle City – Amusement park

Jungle City Amusement park

Located in Doornik, Wallonie, Belgium, Jungle City Amusement Park is a place where kids can have a lot of fun. The amusement park is located in Quai des Vicinaux 34. This location is 0.3 km from the venue. You can reach the park by phone by calling 069 66 11 49. The phone number is also helpful for making reservations or to ask general questions.

The park also hosts birthdays, bachelorette, stag and hen parties. The children’s rides are perfect for their celebrations and the adults can enjoy some fun in the bar. For a unique experience, the park’s bar staff provides cakes and appetizers for the birthday party. The overgrowth of the trees gives the party a special touch. The children and adults will have a great time in the theme park.

A child can have a great time at Jungle City Amusement Park. For a birthday party, it’s a perfect place to plan an event and celebrate a child’s birthday. You can also celebrate an anniversary at Jungle City Amusement Park. The party is sure to be a success, and you can even have your birthday here! The whole family will enjoy the birthday bash! It’s a unique way to celebrate a special occasion.

25. Le Grand Curtius Museum

Le Grand Curtius Museum

The historical mansion has been transformed into the Le Grand Curtius Museum. It includes world and native artifacts, decorative arts, religious art, and more. The interior of the museum is stunning. The exterior is equally impressive, with its grand staircase and elegantly detailed windows. The interior also features an impressive collection of artworks. Whether you prefer to view works of art in a quiet, intimate setting or in an expansive gallery, you’ll be happy to see this unique museum.

The Grand Curtius Museum is unique in the region because of the concentration of masterpieces that are housed within its walls. The museum contains art from diverse cultures, ranging from ancient Egypt to modern Europe, and from ancient to contemporary. The art works are displayed in chronological order and include examples of religious and industrial arts, as well as glassware. The weltoffenen character of the museum is also highlighted through the collection’s technical know-how.

Another highlight of Le Grand Curtius is the spectacular collection of medieval weapons. The Curtius museum is one of the largest in the world, with a huge, 5000-square-foot museum building. It’s a must for any history or art lover. The museum is located in the historic heart of Liege, on the banks of the Meuse river. It has undergone a multi-million-euro renovation.

26. Coteaux de la Citadelle

Coteaux de la Citadelle

The ruins of the medieval city of Liège can be seen on the hillside of the city. The area is also filled with orchards, woods and fields. The medieval ruins of Liège can be found in this area. The site is open to the public and is a great place for sightseeing. Located in the central part of Liège, Coteaux de la Citadelle is a popular destination for tourists.

The nature park located in the heart of Liege is perfect for a romantic date. You can stroll the many promenades, enjoy the local wildlife, and even go canoeing. For more information on the activities and attractions you can check out the website of the Liege Tourism Office. After you have booked your tickets, you can begin exploring your destination. You can visit the city’s various coteaux and see the beauty of the surrounding area.

Coteaux de la Citadelle is a popular destination for families. The natural surroundings make it a beautiful place to spend the night with your family. There are many events for all ages and interests. The park offers plenty of opportunities to enjoy your leisure time. It is home to a variety of animal species, including birds and reptiles. This park has even won numerous awards and is a must-visit for families.

27. Montagne de Bueren

Montagne de Bueren

Located in Liège, Belgium, the 374-step Montagne de Bueren is a must-see. It is named after a 15th century soldier, Vincent de Boueren, who defended Liège against the French king Charles the Bold. In 1881, the steps were built in his honor, to commemorate 600 soldiers who fought in the town’s defense. Now, visitors can take their time and explore the entire staircase.

While touring the city, be sure to make the trip to the top of the mountain. The colossal staircase provides a fantastic view of the city below. Although the area is small, it’s still worth the trip. And if you’re feeling a bit tired, bring a bottle of water to keep you hydrated. The scenery at the top is spectacular – perfect for posting to Instagram or for a TikTok video.

A great historical landmark in Liege is the Soldier’s Staircase. The staircase begins in the Or Chateau district and winds its way up the hill to the citadel. This historic structure is a perfect example of 19th century engineering. You’ll find surviving elements of the fortress walls and construction, along with several monuments. While you’re here, you’ll also be able to see the fortress’ park.

The steep staircase is located in Liege and is a must-see attraction. It is 70 meters long, with a 30% incline and 374 steps. The stairs are designed by Aldo Rossi and were inspired by the Montagne de Bueren. It is located in the heart of Liege. The city is home to several important museums, including the museum of animals, which is on the site.

28. St. Paul’s Cathedral in Liege

St Pauls Cathedral in Liege

St. Pauls Cathedral in Liège is an edifice that is a part of the religious history of the city. The Liège cathedral was built in the 10th century, but was reconstructed between the 13th and 15th centuries. It was restored in the mid-19th century and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Today, the cathedral is a place of worship and pilgrimage for people from all over the world.

The spire of St. Pauls Cathedral in Liege is topped with a large glass oculus. It is a popular place to celebrate Mass. The tower is one of the most striking features of the city. Visitors are welcomed by an ornate interior. The stained glass windows depict scenes from the Last Supper and the Corpus Christi procession. These works were created by renowned Belgian artist Max Ingrand. The apse of the northern nave is a burial place for bishops of Liege. The ruins of the buildings were destroyed by Brabant armies in 1212. However, the church was slowly rebuilt in gothic style, and was finished in the sixteenth century.

The collegiate church of St. Paul was first constructed in the 10th century. In the 19th century, it became the cathedral of Liege after the Revolution of 1830 destroyed the previous cathedral. The cathedral is home to beautiful Renaissance art, including paintings and sculptures. The interiors have beautiful interiors. There is also a neoclassical chapel. If you’re looking for an unforgettable experience, St.Pauls Cathedral in Liege is the perfect place for you.

29. Liège-Guillemins railway station

Liège-Guillemins railway station

The Liège-Guillemins railway station is the main train station in the city of Liège. This is the third largest city in Belgium, and the third largest in the European Union. It is also one of four stations in the country that are part of the high-speed rail network. It is a great place to explore the city and its surroundings by train. Here are some of the top reasons to visit the station:

Located about three kilometers outside of the city center, the Liege-Guillemins railway station can be reached by taxi, public transport, or walking. Bicycles are a good way to get around the city, but be careful if you’re traveling alone as busy roads are not safe. If you do ride a bicycle, you should hire one from a rental company such as Blue-bike or Pro Velo. If you’d prefer to take public transportation, TEC has busses that take about 20 minutes.

The new Lige-Guillemins railway station was designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. Its futuristic façade is made of glass, steel, and white concrete, and is made to resemble a rocket. The modern design of the building has a distinctly contemporary look, despite being built in 2009. A new bridge between the town’s two neighborhoods was built through the train station’s roof.

30. Castle of Bouillon

Castle of Bouillon

A medieval castle, Bouillon Castle is located in the town of Bouillon, Wallonia, Belgium. This medieval structure is well worth a visit if you are looking for a unique experience. You can tour the interior of this magnificent structure and learn about its history, and enjoy a delicious lunch in one of the local restaurants. While you are at the Castle of Bolon, you should also check out the nearby cities, such as Leuven, which is a must-see.

In the fortified walls, you can find the Bird of Prey Spectacle, where you can see raptor performance shows. You can also observe medieval falconry and learn about bird behavior in this enchanting place. You might also notice a stuffed owl or a vulture sitting on a perch after a spectacular show. It is hard to miss these majestic birds, even if you aren’t a big fan of owls.

The castle is located at the highest point in Bouillon, where you can admire the panoramic view of the area. The chateau also features a falconry display, which is held twice a day between 01 March and 11 November. You can visit the Scriptura museum to learn about the history of the castle and its school. You can also view the fresco “The armed pilgrimage of Godefroy de Bouillon” at the museum.

31. Dinant Citadel

Dinant Citadel

The Walloon city of Dinant has a beautiful and fascinating Citadel. It was built in 1815 and originally fortified in 1051. At that time, the province was under the rule of the Prince-Bishopric of Liège. It is now one of the best preserved walloon castles in Europe. While visiting the Dinant Citadel, you will get to know the fascinating history of this city.

The Dinant Citadel is an important historical site in France, and the museum is a must-see. The fort is a great example of a fortified city, and the artillery and small arms displayed inside will help you understand how the fort worked. The museums’ dioramas illustrate various military campaigns. The display on the First World War has a collapsed trench. The 1944 Battle of the Bulge is explained through a series of dioramas. Visitors will also be able to see a large collection of copper dindanderie.

A visit to the Dinant Citadel is sure to leave you spellbound. It is a magnificent building located on the banks of the Meuse, surrounded by nature. Its past is rich in history, and the architecture of the citadel is reminiscent of medieval times. Its majestic facade is a great place to take photos of the magnificent structure. The museum is free to visit, and it is open from 7 am to 7 pm. There are also informational lampposts around the town, and a statue of Adolphe Sax.

32. Bastogne War Museum

Bastogne War Museum

The Battle of the Bulge is a significant part of World War II history and one of the most popular battles in the history of the conflict. The Bastogne War Museum is a must-visit if you’re interested in how the allied forces were defeated. The museum is located in the Belgian province of Luxembourg. The Bastogne War Memorial is open to the public every day of the week. Admission is free.

The battle for Bastogne lasted for six weeks in the snow and Arctic cold of the Ardennes. It’s the site of a famous Allied resistance. The newly opened Bastogne War Museum honors the brave soldiers who fought against the Nazis. The exhibits will help visitors understand what it was like to live through the dreaded Second World War and to appreciate the importance of history. The museum’s interactive displays include interviews with veteran soldiers, film footage, and more.

The museum covers many aspects of the war, but the focus is on the Battle of the Bulge. The museum features replicas of key battle scenes, including the famous Sherman tank. These exhibits offer a unique look into the hardships and suffering of the combatants. The US Army 11th Division has a special exhibition of the War of the Bulge. The US Army 11th Division was responsible for many of the major victories in the Allied army.

33. Château Féodal de La Roche-en-Ardenne

Château Féodal de La Roche-en-Ardenne

Near La Roche-en-Ardenne is the ruins of a medieval castle. It is located on a rocky ridge and loop of the Ourthe river. The castle’s origins go back to a Celtic oppidum. Today, the ruins serve as a place of culture and learning. The ruins are open to the public for guided tours.

Visitors are invited to visit La Roche-en-Ardenne’s castle ruins. The ruins of a feodal castle are a highlight of the city. The town is located on a rocky ridge, which makes it easy to get to by car. The ruins are home to several artifacts. The ruins are still used as a museum. The site was once a Roman fortified camp, but has been largely restored.

A visit to this historical castle is not complete without taking in the scenery. The town is home to an arboretum that is the largest in Belgium. There are many sculptures, as well as a natural reserve. In addition to the museum, the area is also home to a brandsport centre, which offers a variety of sports and courses for people of all ages.

The ruins of La Roche-en-Ardenne date back to the eleventh century and are located in the Wallonia region of Belgium. A visit to this historic site is worth the time. The site is a fascinating example of French and Belgian architecture. While the site is still in ruins, the ruins are a great place to observe the town’s history and cultural heritage.

34. Citadel of Namur

Citadel of Namur

The citadel of Namur is a historic fortress in the Walloon city of Namur. The castle sits on the banks of the Meuse and Sambre rivers and has been in continuous use since Roman times. Several reconstructions have taken place in the fortress over the centuries, with the current design being designed by Menno van Coehorn and improved by Vauban after the 1692 siege.

The citadel is a popular tourist attraction in Belgium, and a recent lighting project has added to its appeal. The Color Kinetics system is a way for the City of Namur to present dynamic light shows. The new illumination of the citadel, inaugurated on October 13, 2017, accentuates the impressive history of the structure and its importance as a European monument. This is a great way to learn about the Citadel’s history and learn about its unique position in the world.

The underground levels of the citadel have recently been restored to offer an immersive tour, featuring a light and sound show. Visitors can also learn about the city’s 2,000-year history at the Terra Nova Visitor Center. The Tourist Train offers panoramic views of the surrounding area and commentary. You can also take a guided tour of the forge or the other buildings. The above-ground areas of the citadel are free and open to the public.

35. Pont de Fragnée

Pont de Fragnee

The Hotel-Restaurant Auberge Magnette is a traditional farmhouse located 4.4 km from the venue. It offers free WiFi and parking and has a dining area with a Bourbonnais-style cuisine. Guests can enjoy the local specialties from the restaurant’s menu. Guests can also enjoy a relaxing afternoon at the swimming pool, which is located a 15-minute drive from the hotel. The property is located near the Canal de Berry and the Canal Museum. For those traveling on their own, the POD des deux chenes provides self-catering accommodations with a flat-screen TV.

The Le Pont de Fragne offers free parking and free WiFi throughout the hotel. This hotel has a restaurant and bar serving an a la carte menu. Guests can enjoy a meal in the onsite restaurant or in the comfortable living room. A complimentary cot can be provided for children under two. Guests can also enjoy a complimentary breakfast and use the hotel’s private parking lot. Depending on the length of their stay, this hotel may have limited availability.

The Chateau Besson is a historic building located in Montlucon. It offers a garden, a terrace, BBQ facilities and free on-site parking. Other accommodations in the area include the Domitys Les Rives du Cher, which features self-catering units and an indoor pool. These properties also offer a fitness room and a spa. The Domitys Les Rives du Cher has a free shuttle service.

36. The Battlefields of Flanders

The Battlefields of Flanders

World War I’s Battlefields are better known as the Flanders Fields. They span the Belgian provinces of West and East Flanders as well as part of the French department of Nord-Pas-de-Calais. Although these battlefields are not technically in France, the name French and Belgian Flanders are used interchangeably. Here are some tips for visiting these locations and learning about this historical conflict.

The Trench Experience: The famous reconstructed network of trenches can be visited. Though the trenches are not filled with mud, you can still feel the suffocating mud that the opposing armies fought in. You can also visit the In Flanders Field Museum. Located in the Belgian town of Iepes, better known by its French name Ypres, the museum is home to numerous exhibits. You’ll be amazed by the incredible history of this place.

One of the best ways to see the history of The Battlefields of Flanders is to hire a tour guide. A number of tour guides offer guided tours. You can also book a battlefield guide through the local tourist office or museum. Some of these tour guides provide private services, and some even operate out of Bed & Breakfast accommodations. So, when you’re looking for a battlefield tour, make sure to choose the right one for your needs.

For visual experience you may have a look on this video.

Suggested Reads: Places to visit in European Countries.

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