Places to visit in Slovakia

Places to visit in Slovakia

Slovak Republic is a landlocked country in Central Europe. Its border countries include Poland to the north, Ukraine to the east, Hungary to the south, Austria to the southwest, and the Czech Republic to the northwest. Its capital, Bratislava, is the capital of Slovakia. In fact, it is the largest city in the country and is one of the most visited. Its many attractions are diverse and unique.

The Levoca town center is a UNESCO-listed UNESCO site. The medieval old town is surrounded by narrow streets and colorful houses. The Old Town Hall and the Evangelical Lutheran Church are both located in the picturesque park Namestie Majstra Pavla. St. James Church is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and its mighty wooden altar is the highest in the world.

The city centre is visually appealing. If you’d like to see artifacts from the Neolithic period to the medieval era, you must visit the Museum of City History in Bratislava. This museum is housed in the old town hall tower and offers a panoramic view of the town square. You can view the history of Slovakia at the National Museum and the Slovak Gallery. You can also check out a few museums in the town center.

Banská Bystrica: This ancient town was once the richest town in Slovakia. It was built by rich miners in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and is on the UNESCO World Heritage list. The town center is well preserved and is one of the most charming towns in Slovakia. You can even take a boat ride along the Dunajec river. The castle and the town center are UNESCO-listed.

There are countless ways to explore the city. Depending on the season, you can opt for an outdoor activity at one of the national parks. You can climb through gorges and cliff faces, or try your hand at kayaking. A variety of other sports will keep you busy in Slovakia. So, whatever your passion, there are plenty of places to visit in Slovakia. You can enjoy the city’s vibrant culture while discovering its fascinating history.

14 Best Places to Visit in Slovakia

  1. Banská Štiavnica
  2. Bardejov
  3. Bratislava
  4. Košice
  5. Liptov
  6. Pieštàny
  7. Poprad
  8. Slovak Carpathians
  9. Slovak Karst Caves
  10. Slovak Paradise National Park
  11. Spiš
  12. Stará Lubovna
  13. Trencín
  14. Žilina

1. Banská Štiavnica

Banská Štiavnica

If you want to experience medieval culture and history, Banská tiavnica, Slovakia is the place to go. This town is located in an ancient caldera that was created when an ancient volcano collapsed. It is surrounded by the tiavnica Mountains and boasts an incredible number of places to visit. In this article, you’ll discover some of the best things to do and see in this unique town.

The city is home to several places of interest, including the historic mining museum and the famous Kalvaria. The first attraction is the Knocking Tower, which is a two-storey building with Renaissance and Baroque features. The tower is now a tea house, which makes a great spot for photos. In medieval Stiavnica, the town became famous for its precious metal mining. It was home to some of the world’s most important specialists and engineers. The town was founded by Maria Theresa, who founded the Mining Academy, which is still one of the oldest universities of its kind in the world.

The town is also home to the 100,000 Love Box, which is related to the famous romantic poem Marina. The Love Bank is a small museum located inside the house of poet Marina Pischlova. Its a place where visitors can purchase a love box. While the Love Bank isn’t large, it has plenty of other interesting information about the poet’s poem. And it’s also a great place to buy souvenirs.

2. Bardejov

Bardejov

The northern town of Bardejov is located on the floodplain terrace of the Topa River in the hills of the Beskyd Mountains. It is an important cultural and historical center with numerous historical and cultural monuments. The medieval town centre of the town is still intact. Visitors to Bardejov should not miss the medieval buildings and museums. You should also explore the acropolis and the church in this enchanting town.

The main square is rectangular and surrounded by colorful tenements. In the center of the square are arcades with restaurants, shops, and an old Gothic-Renaissance town hall. Outside of the Market, the Sariski Museum is located. St. Idzi’s Gothic church is worth a visit and boasts eleven beautiful Gothic altars. From the tower, you can get a great view of the entire city.

The historical center of Bardejov is a picturesque square with a Gothic-style church. The oldest and best preserved wooden church in Slovakia, Hervatov is one of the most important UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Inside the church, you’ll find frescoes, icons, and murals that tell the history of the town. If you’re visiting Bardejov, don’t miss the old Jewish cemetery, which is located nearby.

3. Bratislava

 Bratislava

The capital of Slovakia, Bratislava is surrounded by vineyards and is near Hungary and Austria. Little Carpathian mountains crisscross the city and there are hiking trails throughout. While visiting the capital, you must check out the old town, which has many lively bars and restaurants. Don’t miss the picturesque Bratislava Castle, which sits on a hill overlooking the city.

The Old Town of Bratislava is the heart of the city. The Neo-Renaissance Slovak National Theater is a must-see, and the paths surrounding it are charming. If you are looking for a bite to eat, try stopping by a cafe. The square is also home to the largest shopping mall in Bratislava, the Eurovea Galleria. The new Eurovea shopping center has brought life to the waterfront, making it a great place to shop.

For a cultural experience, head to Bratislava’s Old Town. You won’t find a city center quite like this one anywhere else in Slovakia. This is a city that has a rich history and is well-preserved for its architecture and beautiful gardens. If you are a history buff, you can spend a day walking through the medieval streets, checking out the castle, and enjoying the food, beer, and wine.

4. Košice

Košice

The best time to visit Koice is from May to October. The city is located in the eastern part of the country near the Hungarian border, and has a lot to offer. You can explore the Lower Gate archaeological complex, which preserves fortifications from the 13th century. You can also see 2 Gothic churches in the main square, including St. Elisabeth Cathedral, which is huge and 14th century, and St. Michael Chapel. There is even a wax figurine museum in St. Urban’s Tower, which is a popular place to visit during the summer.

The Gothic-style church is one of the most popular attractions in Koice, Slovakia. This building was constructed during the Renaissance period, and has a beautiful façade. The interior of the church is filled with art and architecture, and the surrounding courtyard is filled with carved stone statues and fountains. If you’re visiting Koice during this period, you’ll want to take time to explore its medieval castles.

In the town center, you’ll find the Renaissance Town Hall and St. James’s Church. The town’s burgher quarter is a popular destination and offers many wonderful photo opportunities. You’ll also be close to the Rozalia cemetery, a natural gallery of statues. The cemetery is dedicated to St. Rosalia, the saint who guarded the city from plague. The crypt is an attraction that evokes both silence and history.

5. Liptov

Liptov

There are many interesting places to visit in Liptov Slovakia. The historical and geographical region of Liptov has a population of about 140,000. It is also known by its German name, Polish name, Hungarian name, and Latin – Liptovium. The area is characterized by a number of cultural attractions. You can explore the town’s rich history at historic monuments and museums.

The town is home to some of the world’s best-known athletes, including Olympic gold medalists in canoe slalom and skiing. The town’s Old Town is one of the most beautiful and well-preserved in Slovakia. You can also learn more about the history of Liptov by visiting its village museum and the National Museum. For an adrenaline rush, you can try out the Gino Paradise Besenova Aquapark, a year-round attraction with nine pools.

If you want to try something different, you can take a bike ride in the surrounding mountains. You can ride on the Chopok cable car or the Malino Brdo cable car, and get some great views of the town. There are over 850 km of marked bike trails in the surrounding area, and you can hire an electric bike if you want to avoid the hassle of parking. The roads in the town are also well maintained and easy to cycle, even for the most inexperienced cyclists.

6. Pieštàny

6. Pieštàny

Pieany is a town in the western part of Slovakia and is the seat of its own district. It is the largest and most famous spa town in Slovakia, with a population of about 28,000 people. While it has a small population, it is well worth a visit. Here you can enjoy the sights and sounds of this charming town. Here you can also relax at one of the local spas.

The town of Pietny is known for its thermal springs. The water from the craggy cliffs of the Vah river is beneficial for healing joint diseases. The waters are warm enough for a quick dip and can even be used as a medicinal treatment. Ludwig van Beethoven was a frequent visitor here when it was in use for therapeutic purposes. Now the town has modern, huge spa facilities, and offers all kinds of health services.

The town has a water tower which was built in the 20th century. The red roofs of the buildings surrounding the tower create an odd silhouette against the backdrop of the mountains. A glass dome covers the mineral spring below. The tower is not operational but is an interesting site to visit. The surrounding area also has a cooling tower. However, the water tower is not open all days. This museum is best visited in the evening, when the town is not crowded.

7. Poprad

Poprad

At the foot of the High Tatras, Poprad, Slovakia, is the gateway to the Tatras National Park. Explore the historical center of the town and the 13th century St. Egidius Church on Námestie sv. Egdia, the town’s central square. Take in the beauty of centuries-old houses in the Spiská Sobota district, and visit the Tatra Gallery to see works of visual art in a former power station.

If you’re into climbing, you’ll love the new Woodrock Poprad. This former concrete factory now houses a rock climbing gym, and features a coffee shop on the first floor. There’s a 31-metre rock-climbing wall, but that’s not all there is! You can climb up to 13 metres, making this the tallest indoor climbing facility in Central Europe. During the summer months, there are rock-climbing classes held in Poprad, and you can also get an adrenaline rush at Woodrock.

If you’re visiting Poprad, you might want to stay in a hotel and explore the city on your own. You’ll meet locals, learn about local history, and sample some of the best food in the country. It’s a great way to experience the town before spending time on your own. So, what are the Best Places to Visit in Poprad, Slovakia? Read on to learn more!

8. Slovak Carpathians

Slovak Carpathians

The landlocked country of Slovakia is in Central Europe. It is bordered by the Ukraine and Poland to the north, Hungary to the south, and Austria to the west. It also shares borders with the Czech Republic and Ukraine. The land is relatively flat, with many lakes and waterfalls, but Slovakia has a mountainous interior. There are plenty of places to visit in Slovak, including the Carpathian Mountains.

The High Tatras, the country’s largest ski resort, is located in this region. With 26 mountains that rise 2500 meters or higher, this part of Slovakia is reminiscent of the Alps. The most notable peaks are the Gerlachovsky Peak (2655m), the Lomnicky Peak (2554m), and the Slovak National Park, all of which can be visited on foot.

The high Tatras mountain range is an excellent place to hike. At 2,634 meters above sea level, the views from here are amazing. You can visit the Nitra Castle, where you’ll see a Gothic fresco of the Coronation and Death of the Virgin Mary, which was discovered during a large restoration of St. Emerson Cathedral. And don’t miss Cicmany, the world’s first folk architecture reservation. Here, you’ll find traditional log houses decorated in white with typical Slovak patterns.

One of the best ways to explore the Slovak Carpathians is hiking. This beautiful region has some of the highest mountains in Europe and is well-suited for hiking. You’ll find many hiking trails in the region, as well as beautiful landscapes. The White Carpathians are a must-visit, and the White Carpathians Protected Landscape Area is another highlight.

9. Slovak Karst Caves

Slovak Karst Caves

One of the best things to do in Slovak Karst is to take a tour of the caves. Most caves are open from late spring to early autumn, but you can also visit them anytime during the year. If you are looking for a unique and memorable experience, you can opt for guided tours, which will give you the chance to see the fascinating formations up close.

Slovak Karst National Park is a 346-square-kilometer reserve in the country that is also home to the world’s highest stalagmite. You can hike through this natural park and experience the natural beauty of Slovakia’s karsts. It is also home to the lowest-lying classical ice cave and three aragonite caves. A full tour of the Slovak Karst will last around two hours.

The most famous caves in Slovakia are located near the country’s border, and they offer great sightseeing opportunities. A UNESCO-listed natural park, the Slovak Karst is a world heritage site. Slovak and Hungarian national parks are also Schengen-zone-friendly, and the caves in Slovakia and Hungary are quite similar. The best way to explore the Slovakia caves is on foot, but you should make a reservation beforehand.

10. Slovak Paradise National Park

Places to Visit in Slovak Paradise National Park Slovakia

Slovak Paradise National Park is one of the nine national parks of Slovakia. This park protects the Slovak mountain range in the north of Slovenské rudohorie Mountains. The area has many hiking trails and pristine lakes. Getting to the national park is free, and the entire park can be toured in a day.

You can hike or take a horseback ride in the Slovak Paradise National Park. There are several horse farms, with the most interesting being Ranc pod Ostrou skalou. A trip to the Ice Cave is also worthwhile, as the water reservoir is filled with ice. Another place to see in Slovak’s national park is Stratena, a picturesque village. It means Lost village in Slovak, and you can find it in Dedinky.

For a more scenic hike, try hiking up the Stratensky Canyon. This is a longer hike than most, and there is a yellow-marked trail that leads to Havrania skala (1153 m). In addition to the mountains, Slovak Paradise also has water. You can visit the Palcmanska Masa dam in the town of Dedinky.

11. Spiš

Spiš

The Stara Lubovna Castle is one of the most famous places to visit in Spi. It was built in 1311 and has an excellent view over the northeastern part of the town. There is a museum dedicated to the adventurer and national hero Maurice Benyovszky, who was imprisoned in the tower of the castle for ten months. The museum contains a wealth of information about this adventurous character, as well as the history of this beautiful region.

The castle is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and dates back to the 12th century. The castle is built of stone and has fortifications that help keep it safe from marauds. You can tour the museum to learn more about the history of the castle and see medieval torture devices. If you’re interested in the area’s history, Spis is a great place to visit. You’ll find a range of fascinating places to explore while you’re in town.

There are plenty of attractions to enjoy in Spi. The Castle, built in 1140, is a popular place for tourists. It’s located right on the town’s main street, Kosarova, and is home to Slovakia’s Black Madonna Mausoleum Vault. You can also hike up the Strazov mountain, the second highest peak in the country. If you love the outdoors, try to visit the travertine hill of Siva Brada. The bubbling waters are a wonderful sight to see.

12. Stará Lubovna

Stará Lubovna

The town of Stará ubova, located in the northeastern part of Slovakia, is home to many attractions and places to visit. The town is divided into two districts – the main town and the small village district. The towns are both located in the beautiful countryside, and are well worth visiting. The city has a unique blend of historical buildings, natural beauty, and cultural heritage.

The Stara Lubovna Open Air Museum, also known as the Stara Lubovna Folk Architecture Museum, includes traditional smaller dwellings as well as charming period houses. The town is home to numerous log cabins that visitors can tour. There are also several working buildings, including a wooden Catholic Church, which will delight young visitors. It’s worth spending a couple of hours here to truly see the town’s history.

The Lubovna Castle, offers spectacular views of the city from its observation towers. The city has an on-site museum dedicated to Strank, a local hero during World War II. You’ll enjoy a tour of the castle and its surrounding countryside. The town is also known for its scenic landscape. The nearby town of Spi is an excellent place to experience the town’s rich cultural heritage.

13. Trencín

Trencín

Trenn is a city located in western Slovakia, close to the Czech Republic border in the central Váh River valley. It is a major tourist destination, with several places of interest for visitors. The town is home to a population of more than 55,000 people. It is the seat of the Trenn Region and District. For travelers looking for unique and authentic experiences, there are numerous places of interest.

A city rectory is located a short walk from the castle. This historic building dates back to 1324. In 1790, the building was completely destroyed by fire, and two giant bells were melted by the extreme heat. The church was rebuilt in 1911 and 1912, and now boasts an altar painted in 1925. It is also home to a museum, the city’s only museum.

There are several places to eat in the town, including a high-rated sushi restaurant and a popular bar called KUKI. There are also plenty of activities for visitors to do, from exploring the castle to relaxing at the Caracalla Spa. The city is also a great base for touring western Slovakia and the Czech border areas. The town offers fun dining and nightlife options, too.

14. Žilina

Žilina

Ilina, Slovakia is a fascinating place to visit. It is located in northwestern Slovakia, around 200km from the capital, Bratislava, and is close to the Czech and Polish borders. The city is home to a number of interesting attractions, including the Old Town, which is filled with medieval architecture. You’ll also find a Roman-style Roman Catholic cathedral, as well as a medieval fortress, which is still in use today.

The town’s oldest architectural relic is the Church of Saint Stephen the King, located just one kilometer from the center. This Gothic church dates back to 1200-1250. Its interior decoration and wall paintings are both valuable. In recent years, Zilina’s fine artist Mojmir Vlkolacek have restored the Church, making it a popular wedding venue. Regardless of your personal tastes, you’re sure to have a fantastic time in this city.

The wooden church is a unique place to visit in Zilina. Visitors can visit the church for EUR2, but be aware that it is locked most of the time. The entrance fee is EUR2 for adults and free for children. You can call ahead and request a visit, but you should do it as soon as possible. The town is surrounded by calcite cliffs and the Church of St. John the Baptist is a great place to take photos.

If you’re looking for a romantic weekend getaway, Slovakia is the right place for you. It has an abundance of historic sites and cities. The capital, Bratislava, is home to the oldest capital city in the world, which makes it a popular destination for tourists. You can also visit the UNESCO-listed Spis Castle, which is the oldest building in the country. The bell tower, medieval walls, and the Spisska Kapitula’s medieval walls make it a wonderful spot for a romantic break.

A trip to Slovakia isn’t complete without visiting a local museum or historic landmark. In the town of Stara Lubovna, you can experience the traditional way of life of Slovaks by touring their wooden decorated houses. Lime was first used for protection of the wood in the villages, but later on locals discovered that it looked attractive, and began painting ornaments all over the village. This tradition continues in the village today.

The historical capital of Slovakia, Bratislava, is the best place to visit if you want to experience a real slice of life in the country. There are numerous historical sights to see in Bratislava, including the grand Bratislava Castle. You can also visit the famous Devin Castle, which offers a spectacular view of the entire city. If you have time to spare, you can also check out the many medieval buildings in the city.

For an outdoor adventure, you can visit the picturesque towns of Slovakia. These towns are full of historical buildings and landmarks. Some of the most beautiful towns in Slovakia include Stara Lubovna. The town’s main square is one of the largest in Slovakia, and you can see its cathedral from there. If you’re a history buff, it is worth a visit. If you’re an outdoor person, you can also visit the nearby mountains.

If you love to hike, the Slovak Paradise National Park is a must-visit. Located on the outskirts of the town, this open-air museum features the history of mining in Slovakia. You can also go underground to explore the mines. In addition to this, the town is home to the magnificent Banska Stiavnica Calvary, which is one of the most beautiful Baroque calvaries in Europe.

For Some great visual experience watch this video.

Suggested Reads: Best Places to visit in Europe.

Leave a Comment